Anthony Talbot – Owner and Stylist, Anthony Talbot London

1. What do you love most about your job?

The creativity. I used to be an artist when I was at school and I’ve always loved painting and drawing. But then when I found a more three-dimensional form of artwork, which was hairdressing, it took over. Seeing people smile when you walk out the door when you’ve done a massive change. I don’t think there’s any better job in the world—I love what I do.

2. What is the most difficult part of your job?

Finding staff. By far. There’s plenty of people out there, but not everyone is willing to put in the effort it takes. Not everyone is up to scratch either. The UK and Australia have different qualifications and also the changes in legislation to the 457 visas means there’s a smaller talent pool. The industry has changed as well with a lot of individuals choosing to go out on their own.

3. Why Anthony Talbot London is a good place to work?

It’s fun. It’s like walking into your lounge room. It’s very welcoming. We all have a big laugh. I have always encouraged having a good work environment because you spend more time with your colleagues than you do with your family. So it’s important to have a laugh at work. You can’t have staff dreading coming in every day. I have always made it light. I take the team out for a meal or drinks every few weeks after work to keep that sense of team bonding. Also to let them know I am a normal person—not just their boss.

We do take our jobs seriously, because we always want excellence walking out the door. But, what’s wrong with having fun while doing it? The staff I have been here a long time. Once they start they don’t leave!

4. How many people do you currently employ?

Eight including myself.

5. In your experience, when do you know you need to hire new talent?

The volume of work—when I start having to work six or even seven days a week. I don’t want to be doing that and my staff don’t either, so that’s when it’s time to find someone new.

6. In a small business, there’s no room for bad hires. What’s your most important interview question?

It isn’t just about me liking the person. I have a three stage process. Stage 1, I usually do a quick, 10-minute interview. Stage 2 involves coming in to the salon to do a trade test, because I want to see the quality of work they do. Unlike many other salons, I pay for their time to do that. The customer doesn’t pay a cent to get their hair done, but I pay for the candidate as they’re taking their time to come in and show me their work. Stage 3 is where they come in again and sit down with all of my staff and they get to ask the candidate questions. You spend more time with your working team than with your loved ones. You can’t put a bad apple into the barrow as it will spoil the lot.

7. What challenges have you faced finding the right candidates for your business?

People phoning up to book in for an interview and then just never turning up. I’ve never experienced that in the UK, but it’s been an issue here. Changes to the 457 visas for hair stylists have made it an absolute nightmare to try to find people.

8. How long have you been using Indeed and what was the reason for including it in your hiring strategy?

More than ten years. I used Indeed in the UK to find staff for my salons there and have been using it in Australia too.

9. Prior to using Indeed, describe your approach to sourcing talent?

Back in the UK when I first started out in hairdressing, I’d put an ad in the paper and I would be inundated with responses. Not anymore. Everyone is online now. It’s much better to use online job sites to find people as that’s where they’re looking. I did try putting ads on Facebook, but that didn’t work.

10. What are the main benefits Anthony Talbot London has experienced since using Indeed?

Generally, I have found the quality of candidates coming from Indeed really good, and the volume of candidates too.

11. What advice do you have for other small business owners when hiring staff?

Often when you work for a large company you are just a number. You get taken on as a number so it makes no difference if you do a great job or an average job as you’re still going to get paid. Whereas, in a small company, you have to give 110%. If you get one wrong person, they let the whole team down. I think that’s the case right up until you’re at around 100 employees. One bad apple can ruin your company and give you a bad reputation. That’s why when recruiting for a small business you have to be really careful as it can make or break you.

Anthony Talbot – Owner and Stylist, Anthony Talbot London

1. What do you love most about your job?

The creativity. I used to be an artist when I was at school and I’ve always loved painting and drawing. But then when I found a more three-dimensional form of artwork, which was hairdressing, it took over. Seeing people smile when you walk out the door when you’ve done a massive change. I don’t think there’s any better job in the world—I love what I do.

2. What is the most difficult part of your job?

Finding staff. By far. There’s plenty of people out there, but not everyone is willing to put in the effort it takes. Not everyone is up to scratch either. The UK and Australia have different qualifications and also the changes in legislation to the 457 visas means there’s a smaller talent pool. The industry has changed as well with a lot of individuals choosing to go out on their own.

3. Why Anthony Talbot London is a good place to work?

It’s fun. It’s like walking into your lounge room. It’s very welcoming. We all have a big laugh. I have always encouraged having a good work environment because you spend more time with your colleagues than you do with your family. So it’s important to have a laugh at work. You can’t have staff dreading coming in every day. I have always made it light. I take the team out for a meal or drinks every few weeks after work to keep that sense of team bonding. Also to let them know I am a normal person—not just their boss.

We do take our jobs seriously, because we always want excellence walking out the door. But, what’s wrong with having fun while doing it? The staff I have been here a long time. Once they start they don’t leave!

4. How many people do you currently employ?

Eight including myself.

5. In your experience, when do you know you need to hire new talent?

The volume of work—when I start having to work six or even seven days a week. I don’t want to be doing that and my staff don’t either, so that’s when it’s time to find someone new.

6. In a small business, there’s no room for bad hires. What’s your most important interview question?

It isn’t just about me liking the person. I have a three stage process. Stage 1, I usually do a quick, 10-minute interview. Stage 2 involves coming in to the salon to do a trade test, because I want to see the quality of work they do. Unlike many other salons, I pay for their time to do that. The customer doesn’t pay a cent to get their hair done, but I pay for the candidate as they’re taking their time to come in and show me their work. Stage 3 is where they come in again and sit down with all of my staff and they get to ask the candidate questions. You spend more time with your working team than with your loved ones. You can’t put a bad apple into the barrow as it will spoil the lot.

7. What challenges have you faced finding the right candidates for your business?

People phoning up to book in for an interview and then just never turning up. I’ve never experienced that in the UK, but it’s been an issue here. Changes to the 457 visas for hair stylists have made it an absolute nightmare to try to find people.

8. How long have you been using Indeed and what was the reason for including it in your hiring strategy?

More than ten years. I used Indeed in the UK to find staff for my salons there and have been using it in Australia too.

9. Prior to using Indeed, describe your approach to sourcing talent?

Back in the UK when I first started out in hairdressing, I’d put an ad in the paper and I would be inundated with responses. Not anymore. Everyone is online now. It’s much better to use online job sites to find people as that’s where they’re looking. I did try putting ads on Facebook, but that didn’t work.

10. What are the main benefits Anthony Talbot London has experienced since using Indeed?

Generally, I have found the quality of candidates coming from Indeed really good, and the volume of candidates too.

11. What advice do you have for other small business owners when hiring staff?

Often when you work for a large company you are just a number. You get taken on as a number so it makes no difference if you do a great job or an average job as you’re still going to get paid. Whereas, in a small company, you have to give 110%. If you get one wrong person, they let the whole team down. I think that’s the case right up until you’re at around 100 employees. One bad apple can ruin your company and give you a bad reputation. That’s why when recruiting for a small business you have to be really careful as it can make or break you.

Anthony Talbot – Owner and Stylist, Anthony Talbot London

1. What do you love most about your job?

The creativity. I used to be an artist when I was at school and I’ve always loved painting and drawing. But then when I found a more three-dimensional form of artwork, which was hairdressing, it took over. Seeing people smile when you walk out the door when you’ve done a massive change. I don’t think there’s any better job in the world—I love what I do.

2. What is the most difficult part of your job?

Finding staff. By far. There’s plenty of people out there, but not everyone is willing to put in the effort it takes. Not everyone is up to scratch either. The UK and Australia have different qualifications and also the changes in legislation to the 457 visas means there’s a smaller talent pool. The industry has changed as well with a lot of individuals choosing to go out on their own.

3. Why Anthony Talbot London is a good place to work?

It’s fun. It’s like walking into your lounge room. It’s very welcoming. We all have a big laugh. I have always encouraged having a good work environment because you spend more time with your colleagues than you do with your family. So it’s important to have a laugh at work. You can’t have staff dreading coming in every day. I have always made it light. I take the team out for a meal or drinks every few weeks after work to keep that sense of team bonding. Also to let them know I am a normal person—not just their boss.

We do take our jobs seriously, because we always want excellence walking out the door. But, what’s wrong with having fun while doing it? The staff I have been here a long time. Once they start they don’t leave!

4. How many people do you currently employ?

Eight including myself.

5. In your experience, when do you know you need to hire new talent?

The volume of work—when I start having to work six or even seven days a week. I don’t want to be doing that and my staff don’t either, so that’s when it’s time to find someone new.

6. In a small business, there’s no room for bad hires. What’s your most important interview question?

It isn’t just about me liking the person. I have a three stage process. Stage 1, I usually do a quick, 10-minute interview. Stage 2 involves coming in to the salon to do a trade test, because I want to see the quality of work they do. Unlike many other salons, I pay for their time to do that. The customer doesn’t pay a cent to get their hair done, but I pay for the candidate as they’re taking their time to come in and show me their work. Stage 3 is where they come in again and sit down with all of my staff and they get to ask the candidate questions. You spend more time with your working team than with your loved ones. You can’t put a bad apple into the barrow as it will spoil the lot.

7. What challenges have you faced finding the right candidates for your business?

People phoning up to book in for an interview and then just never turning up. I’ve never experienced that in the UK, but it’s been an issue here. Changes to the 457 visas for hair stylists have made it an absolute nightmare to try to find people.

8. How long have you been using Indeed and what was the reason for including it in your hiring strategy?

More than ten years. I used Indeed in the UK to find staff for my salons there and have been using it in Australia too.

9. Prior to using Indeed, describe your approach to sourcing talent?

Back in the UK when I first started out in hairdressing, I’d put an ad in the paper and I would be inundated with responses. Not anymore. Everyone is online now. It’s much better to use online job sites to find people as that’s where they’re looking. I did try putting ads on Facebook, but that didn’t work.

10. What are the main benefits Anthony Talbot London has experienced since using Indeed?

Generally, I have found the quality of candidates coming from Indeed really good, and the volume of candidates too.

11. What advice do you have for other small business owners when hiring staff?

Often when you work for a large company you are just a number. You get taken on as a number so it makes no difference if you do a great job or an average job as you’re still going to get paid. Whereas, in a small company, you have to give 110%. If you get one wrong person, they let the whole team down. I think that’s the case right up until you’re at around 100 employees. One bad apple can ruin your company and give you a bad reputation. That’s why when recruiting for a small business you have to be really careful as it can make or break you.

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